Debunking Normal: Accessibility Awareness Training

Topic
Accessibility
Audience
Beginner
Description

Historically, society has seen disability as something someone “had” or “suffered from”, and because of that, they had “special needs” to get through life. Those who were disabled were not “normal,” but “different” and often seen as “less.” Less capable. Less intelligent. Less involved. Less whole. 

Society has a history of being wrong. 

Disability is not a bad word nor does it mean a bad life. 

In this training we’ll dive into what disability is and exactly how common our differences are. We’ll discuss the different types of disability and some of the identifications within those types. We’ll talk about the characteristics associated with those identifications - including strengths.

Come away from this with a view on disability you may never have encountered in addition to the vocabulary to talk about it as you move forward. Debunk the idea that “different” and “special” are the same as accessible Be exposed to what we can look for that will help us break down societal barriers and encourage inclusion.

Goals
Come away from this with a view on disability you may never have encountered in addition to the vocabulary to talk about it as you move forward. Debunk the idea that “different” and “special” are the same as accessible Be exposed to what we can look for that will help us break down societal barriers and encourage inclusion.
Training Length
Half Day
Room
TBD
Timeslot
Half Day Afternoon (1:00 PM - 4:00 PM)
Trainers
Profile picture for user dbungard
FFW
Project Manager

I am a muse. 

People would often read stories as children and see the muses as the artistic beauties that were the daughters of a god, inspiring their marks with magic. Me, I see them as creative strategists whose mission is to empower the people around them.

Connecting with people, digitally or otherwise, means growth, evolution, and ultimately success. Over the years I’ve learned the value of a conversation,  writing, the importance of building rapport and connection, while establishing a common vocabulary. It sounds basic, almost trivial, but those simple lessons are the cornerstone of my approach. Accessibility can be hard to relate to, but being human is not.